Building Mobile Applications

Computer Science E-76

Harvard Extension School
Dan Armendariz, Instructor
danallan@mit.edu
http://danallan.net/
David J. Malan, Instructor
malan@harvard.edu
http://cs.harvard.edu/malan
Today's applications are increasingly mobile. Computers are no longer confined to desks and laps but instead live in our pockets and hands. This course teaches students how to build mobile apps for Android and iOS, two of today's most popular platforms, and how to deploy them in Android Market and the App Store. Students learn how to write native apps for Android using Eclipse and the Android SDK, how to write native apps for iPhones, iPod touches, and iPads using Xcode and the iOS SDK, and how to write web apps for both platforms.

This is OpenCourseWare.

Computer Science E-76 is a course at Harvard Extension School.

Even if you are not a student at Harvard, you are welcome to "take" this course via cs76.tv by following along via the Internet. (The course's own website is at www.cs76.net.) Available at left are videos of lectures along with PDFs of projects. Sample solutions to the latter are not available, but if you have questions or would like to discuss the material with others, do join the course's Google Group.

If you're a teacher, you are welcome to adopt or adapt these materials for your own course, per the license.

Special thanks to Chris Thayer and Harvard Extension School for the course's videos.

djm

Creative Commons License

Copyright © 2011 – 2014, Dan Armendariz and David J. Malan of Harvard University

This course's content is licensed by Dan Armendariz and David J. Malan of Harvard University under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License, which means that you are not only welcome to "take" this course,

you are free:

  • to Share — to copy, distribute, and transmit this content
  • to Remix — to adapt this content
under the following conditions:
  • Attribution — You must attribute this content to Dan Armendariz and David J. Malan of Harvard University but not in any way that suggests endorsement of you or your use of the work.
  • Noncommercial — You may not use this content for commercial purposes.
  • Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.
with the understanding that:
  • Waiver — Any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from Dan Armendariz or David J. Malan of Harvard University
  • Other Rights — In no way are any of the following rights affected by the license:
    • Your fair dealing or fair use rights;
    • Apart from the remix rights granted under this license, the author's moral rights;
    • Rights other persons may have either in the work itself or in how the work is used, such as publicity or privacy rights.
  • Notice — For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/.

So that folks (like you!) have a place to turn with questions, we've created a Google Group called cs76-discuss, which is like a message board and mailing list rolled into one.

Once you've joined, you'll be able to email the group at cs76-discuss@googlegroups.com and browse past discussions at https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/cs76-discuss.